Horus copycat thesis

Jesus in ChristianityHistoricity of JesusSources for the historicity of JesusHistorical JesusQuest for the historical Jesusand Portraits of the historical Jesus The origins and rapid rise of Christianity, as well as the historical Jesus and the historicity of Jesusare a matter of longstanding debate in theological and historical research. While Christianity may have started with an early nucleus of followers of Jesus, [q 3] within a few years after the presumed death of Jesus in c.

Horus copycat thesis

Was Horus born of a virgin?: It is at this period, apparently, that the birthday of Horus was annually celebrated, about December 25th, in the temples. As both Macrobius and the Christian writer [of the "Paschal Chronicle"] say, a figure of Horus as a baby was laid in a manger, in a scenic reconstruction of a stable, and a statue of Isis was placed beside it.

Horus was, in a sense, the Savior of mankind. He was their avenger against the powers of darkness; he was the light of the world.

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His birth-festival was a real Christmas before Christ. The celebrants retired into certain inner shrines, from which at midnight they issued with a loud cry, "The Virgin has brought forth! The light is waxing! No doubt the Virgin who thus conceived and bore a son on the twenty-fifth of December was the great Oriental goddess whom the Semites called the Heavenly Virgin or simply the Heavenly Goddess.

Horus copycat thesis

He asked them about the relationship whether Horus experienced a virgin birth. Ten responded; they unanimously agreed that there is no evidence that Horus was born of a virgin 5 Sponsored link.

Did Horus have 12 disciples? I can find references to sixteen human followers. But I cannot find twelve anywhere. Gasque's survey came up empty on the matter of Horus' disciples as well. If the term "crucified" is defined as a Roman crucifixion, the answer is definitely no.

The Roman Army that occupied Judea at the time of Jesus' execution had a highly organized method of executing uppity slaves and insurrectionists. It involved a flogging, forcing the victim to carry the cross arm to the place of execution, stripping the victim, tying his or her limbs in place or rarely nailing them to the wood beamswaiting for the victim to die a slow, lingering death, by asphyxiation.

Finally, the body was thrown on a garbage heap for scavengers to eat. The whole procedure was carefully calculated to terrorize the population. However, some sources claim that he was crucified in the sense of being tied to a tree and allowed to die from asphyxiation and exposure.

On the other hand, Glen M.

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I can find no references to Horus EVER dying, until he later becomes "merged" with Re the Sun god, after which he 'dies' and is 'reborn' every single day as the sun rises. And even in this 'death', there is no reference to a tomb anywhere Unfortunately, reading these information sources can be frustrating.

Many of them contain statements like "Horus was crucified" or "There is no record of Horus being crucified," or "I have found no evidence for The hyperlinks are not necessarily still active today:Apr 22,  · One of the more controversial theories -- sometimes called the "copycat thesis" -- suggests that many of the miracles, other life events, and beliefs about the supernatural status of Horus, an ancient Egyptian God, were incorporated into stories about Jesus as recorded in Gospels and other books in the Christian Scriptures (New Testament).Status: Resolved.

Feedback archive → Feedback Copycat copout: Jesus was not made up from pagan myths Published: 15 October (GMT+10) Linda E. writes concerning an agnostic friend who wrote in support of the copycat thesis: the idea that the gospels copied its stories about Jesus from pagan myths.

Skeptical commentators claim that there are many parallels between the lives of Horus and Jesus; Christian commentators tend to deny the existence of most or all of them, looking upon them as coincidences or -- more likely -- .

One of the more controversial theories -- sometimes called the "copycat thesis" -- suggests that many of the miracles, other life events, and beliefs about Horus -- an ancient Egyptian God -- were recycled and incorporated into stories about Jesus as recorded in Gospels and other books in the Christian Scriptures (New Testament).

Price questioned the historicity of Jesus in a series of books, including Deconstructing Jesus (), The Incredible Shrinking Son of Man (), Jesus Is Dead () and The Christ-Myth Theory and Its Problems (), as well as in contributions to The Historical Jesus: Five Views (), in which he acknowledges that he stands against the .

The Christ myth theory (also known as the Jesus myth theory, Jesus mythicism, or Jesus ahistoricity theory) is "the view that the person known as Jesus of Nazareth had no historical existence." Alternatively, in terms given by Bart Ehrman as per his criticism of .

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